Whisky Review – Bruichladdich by whiskybroker.co.uk

Bruichladdich 9 year old single cask
50%ABV (bottled at)
£35.00 at whiskybroker.co.uk

Details from whiskybroker

This Islay whisky, distilled on 30th June 2004 at Bruichladdich Distillery, has been matured in a bourbon barrel for over 9 years. The cask was heavily charred, with several litres of charred wood being collected in buckets from the empty cask. This has been filtered out, although very small particles may remain in the bottle and are only visible when the bottle is left standing for a period of time.

The whisky has not been chill filtered, nor has any colouring been added. It has been lightly filtered to remove large particles of wood sediment from the cask, but may still contain small traces, which are visible only when bottle is left standing for a period of time.

Cask Details:
Bourbon barrel 638
Distilled 30th June 2004
Bottled 21st August 2013
The cask yielded 273 bottles at 50% vol.

Nose.

More resembling the Islay barley profile than the classic laddie. No smoke here, is is a powerful and rich honey lemon mix with a bouquet of blooming flowers. There is a minute element of the maritime in the background. Some seaside saltiness in the air. A rich vanilla joins with time in the glass and more barley sugar sweetness. More floral and oak spice comes in time with a pepper heat.

Palate.

Quite sweet, but dry at the same time, lots of honey and vanilla, a little toffee. Some citrus. The maritime notes come through mid palate, with some sea salt and iodine. Pepper spices are present throughout. The development carries onto the sweet side, a very rich flavoursome laddie.

Finish.

Long finish. The citrus fruit remains and the sweetness of the barley oils feel very good all the way through to a drying end. A little sawdust, oak spice is at the very finale.

Adding water.

Adding a small drop of water to bring on the mist. The nose has added intensity, the lemon citrus notes are expanded with added honey. Floral and oak spices also provide balance. The nose is reminiscent now of the Islay barley expression but with added age and depth. The palate, while lighter in the mouthfeel, expands the fruit and toffee notes. It is very chew, sweet sugar also expanding with an added creaminess. The finish retains this new creaminess, and smooth texture.

Conclusion.

A really nice complex single cask from Bruichladdich (care of whiskybroker). It’s very Bruichladdich, but also has some nice variation. Having tasted and reviewed the 10 year old and Islay barley just before this whiskybroker release I can say this is a very interesting middle ground. It has elements of both of those previous expressions, but added uniqueness in the intensity of the flavours. There’s no smoke here if your not a smoke fan, just a whole lot of flavour and aromas to explore.

Thanks to Martin at whiskybroker for the cask sample. It’s much appreciated and enjoyed, as will the bottle I purchased be in time. đŸ™‚

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Whisky Review – Bruichladdich Islay Barley 2006

Bruichladdich Islay Barley 2006
50%ABV
Non-chill filtered
No added colour.
£38.95 at TheWhiskyExchange

Nose.

Considering the 50% strength the nose doesn’t burn at a good inhalation, and this dram requires some deep inhalation. Quite immersive a nose. Some vanilla, lots of lemon, lots of honey, kind of lockets (throat sweet) mix going on. It’s easy sniffing, energetic, but accessible. It was described to me at a tasting of a breakfast dram. Agreed! There’s some barley grain coming through, cereal notes, biscuity. Well, this is 5-6 years old, it certainly doesn’t smell that young.

Palate.

From the glass you can see this is a very oily dram, the mouth confirms this. Very mouth coating and pleasurable. The honey lemons are very forward, some vanilla joins in with a little cereal grain notes. Pepper wood spices also present. It’s quite simplistic, but oh so rewarding in the feel good factor. The strength while at 50% doesn’t feel it, and it is easy to drink undiluted.

Finish.

Sweet, lemon oil, short-medium, drying out and remaining citrus rind and some wood tannins.

Adding water.

Easy drinking undiluted, but need to try to add a little water for experimentation sake. The nose actually gets more intensive with water. More honey and lemon, and some floral additions come in to the fray. On the palate the flavours come more intensive also, added sweetness, buckets of honey and lemon and citrus peel are joined with some oak spice, grass and flower softness. It’s very chewy and exceedingly sip able. The finish remains soulful and that feel good happy factor is just bursting through.

Conclusion.

Definitely a breakfast dram. It’s not an epic, complex dram, but it is full of flavour, and the enjoyment factor is off the scale. It’s an easy dram, a starter for a session, but the thing is. I don’t think it will be easy to move onto the next dram, because I just want another one of these!

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Whisky Review – Bruichladdich 10 – the Laddie Ten


Bruichladdich – 10 year old
46%ABV
Non-chill filtered
No added colour.
£31.91 at MasterOfMalt

Nose.

Smokey fruit stew. For an un-peated dram, it’s got some real smoke in the nose. The fruit is rich and has some great depths. Feels older than 10. We have overripe melon, ripe lemons, citrus rind, some light vanilla and honey all with a smokey BBQ coating. There’s a little meatiness in the background of the BBQ. Getting some seaside, maritime notes now. It’s a compelling, complex nose, which continually evolves and intrigues in the glass.

Palate.

Savoury, some dry fruits, smoke, saltiness. Medicinal notes come through mid palate. Fruit continues through the development, that mixmash of stewed and overripe citrus sings about the place.

Finish.

Mouth coating, drying, smoke and maritime remain. It’s not massively maritime or peaty like many islay whiskies, but it has enough to make you know this is from the island.

Adding water.

This is quite easy going at undiluted strength. But adding a small drop of water to see what’s what. A little less maritime and smoke on the nose. Fruit comes to the forefront. The palate is lighter on the mouthfeel, but remains similar in flavour profile and development in the mouth. It’s overall quite a bit crisper and lighter. The finish is less smokey, and sweeter.

Conclusion.

Personally i prefer this one undiluted. This is a unique whisky. I’ve been a fan of this whisky and Bruichladdich since early in my whisky journey, just never got around to writing about it. I love the 10 year old, it’s a stable dram, complex undiluted and worthy of lengthy investigation. A true journey of smell and taste.

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Whisky Review – Glenfiddich 14 Year Old Rich Oak

Glenfiddich 14 Year Old Rich Oak
40%ABV
£34.44 at MasterOfMalt

Nose.

Dominated by fruit. Apples. Pineapples. Lemon rind. Lots of wood spices. Pepper. Dusty toasted oak. Vanilla. Burnt toast.

Palate.

Lots of sweet toffee. Fundamentally oaky with lots of gentle wood spice and a little pepper heat. There is a chewiness to this dram which I wasn’t expecting. A lot of rich vanilla also dominates the palate. The development turns dry into the finish.

Finish.

Dry. Lots of wood spice. Spiced vanilla, a little toffee.

Adding water.

A small drop due to the bottled strength. The nose looses some of the fruit elements in favour of toffee sweetness, vanilla and oak spice. The palate remains the same, now with the nose more representative of the palate. The finish is more oaky, with some added sawdust.

Conclusion.

This is a nicely balanced, well aged and constructed dram. It is however, very woody and uncomplicated. If you like your drams with buckets of wood spice and vanilla this is for you. Personally I far prefer other whiskies in the core Glenfiddich range, with my favourite being the 15 year old Solera reserve. So far anyway, I still have the 21 year old and Snow Phoenix expressions to try in the near future.

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Whisky Review – Glendronach 15 Year Old Revival

Glendronach 15 Year Old Revival
46%ABV
Non-chill filtered
Natural colour
£38.95 at TheWhiskyExchange

Nose.

Welcome to sherry heaven. Rich, heavy, sherried dark fruits. Thick fruitcake. Intensive sherry oak spices. Nutty aromas are well integrated. Coffee mocha.

Palate.

Mouth coating. Sweet and savoury. Heavy sherry raisins and fruitcake. Fruit and nut chocolate. Coffee in there as well, a little spiced orange. It’s like a bag of revels all melted into one and sherried the hell out of! Some cinnamon and anise linger in the background.

Finish.

Long and resiliently sherried. The fruit and nut sticks around for a good while, with the finish drying out into some wood spice and a little sawdust. It’s very moreish and demands much attention and sipping.

Adding water.

Adding a reasonable drop of water to my dram. I’m sure it can take it. With the alcohol levels toned down the balance of smell becomes more levelled out. Easier to identify and savour. More spices come through in the still heavily thick sherried fruitcake stew aromas. The palate reflects the diluted nose with more spices, and balanced fruit, with the sherry still very much dominant and in control. Luscious. The finish is full of all the good stuff. Fruit and nut nd chocolate and coffee and pleasure and joy, excitement and happiness!

Conclusion.

Glendronach is one of my favourite distilleries, so I am a little biased. I must admit, I’ve done Glendronach a little backwards. I got into their single casks before trying their standard, core releases. This 15 year old being the first core release I’ve tried in depth. It’s a remarkable dram, with shed loads of flavour and pleasure to be experienced. Can’t recommend it high enough for those who like their whisky experience sherried. It’s really quite the bargain.

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