Whisky Review – Balvenie 12 year old single barrel – cask 12742


Balvenie 12 year old single barrel – cask 12742
First fill bourbon barrel maturation.
47.8%ABV
Non-chilled filtered
I would say no colouring
£43.31 from MasterOfMalt

Nose.

Overall a quite delicate, engaging nose. Rich Pineapple cube sweets. Light vanilla. A little pepper. Floral. Light lemon citrus. With time some intensive tart citrus comes through. Some sugar dusting on the sweeties in the sweet shop.

Palate.

Sweet and dry. Lashings of vanilla. Some alcohol nip. Honey. Toffee apple. Mouthfeel is viscous and coats everywhere. Some nicely integrated pepper and oak spices going on as well.

Finish.

Drying oak tannins. Honey malt. Some biscuit. Green fruits. Creamy custard. Pepper.

Adding water.

The nose still has that intensive pineapple going on. A little more powered sugar. The palate is sweeter, with a little more fruit and separation of flavours. Chewy with toffee intensive vanilla. The finish very similar, but I think slightly sweeter. More water added now. Seems even juicier. This dram can take a lot of water and develop nicely. With additional water more dryness comes in on the middle development and finish. I quite like this one personally with extra water. It’s a great dram. Impressive.

Conclusion.

I managed to try some new make from Balvenie at the recent TWE whisky show in London, and I have to say this presentation really shows off their spirit nicely. This is a very accessible, enjoyable, tasty dram. I can see I would like to have a bottle of this on the go as a stable dram. It will be interesting to try alternative casks and compare for consistency.

20131027-003512.jpg

Whisky Review – Glenmorangie Nectar D’or 15 year old.

Glenmorangie Nectar D’or 15 year old
Sauternes Cask Finish
46%ABV
Non-chilled filtered
£44.88 from MasterOfMalt</em>

*please note the version I am tasting is the 15 year old variant which is now hard to find and has been replaced with the 12 year old version which is linked above.

Nose.

Intensely sweet. Icing sugar, vanilla, light lemon citrus, honey, white or highly milked chocolate. Some pepper spices. A little oak. With time in the glass more vanilla sweetness comes through. With more time the lemon citrus asserts itself. It’s ever changing in its dominant aroma and lots of time can be spent with this one. Some waxiness coming through now. Even more time and I’m getting cream and apples.

Palate.

Gentle sweet, warming honey malt. A little salt comes through in the early development. Then cream and chocolate. Pepper, and a little chilli spice. Some vanilla toffee is mixed in there with the heat from the ABV. The mouthfeel is nicely creamy and fulfilling.

Finish.

Sweet and spicy. The pepper stays a while, with sweet oak influences returning for the slightly salty chilli chocolate finale.

Adding water.

Small drop. Wait a while. With water the nose becomes more floral and peppery. Lemon citrus is still evident with some sherbet. The palate is a little less intense, the rich notes of the undiluted palate are dumbed down a little, still most flavours are present, but it looses a little of the power of the undiluted. It is still a very chewable and luscious dram. Finish is more fruity, oaky and floral.

Conclusion.

This is a sweet tooth’s dram. (And having a sweet tooth this rocks my world). Loads of honey syrup sweetness all the way through. A desert whisky without a doubt. Very quaffable and warming. It’s a treat for trick and treaters with all that sugary goodness.

20131026-234843.jpg

Whisky Review – Glencadam 10 year old.

Glencadam 10 year old
46%ABV
Non-chilled filtered
No added colouring
£29.65 from MasterOfMalt

Nose.

Light, sweet, vanilla, honey, citrus juice and peel. Some grass notes. A little creamy toffee in the background. Some candle wax. Surprisingly complex when delving into the nose, initially it felt a little shallow, but it’s deep!

Palate.

Sweetness, chewy hay, vanilla, honey and toffee. Lovely rich mouthfeel. A little warmth from the alcohol volume, but easy to drink at 46%. Some pepper in with the warmth. A little sour in the form of lemon citrus.

Finish.

Drying, some wood oak amongst the vanilla and honey, with some pepper and ginger left behind.

Adding water.

Small drop and the clouds come. Becomes more settled. Some floral comes through on the nose, Parma violets. The nose becomes more integrated and quite delightful. Easy sniffing and easy drinking. On the palate, the reduced ABV allows for a more spicy dram. All of the honey, toffee, vanilla notes are still there, but there is additional wood spices coming through, a little more peppery, but it is still balanced and well rounded. There is an extra level of dryness in the palate now also, which continues through development to the finish. Which is warming, spicy, dry, with vanilla and tasty honeyed oak remaining on the medium-long finish. Personally, I can’t decide if I like it with or without water more, so every dram needs to be a slightly bigger one, first half neat, second half a splash of water.

Conclusion.

A lovely, easy yet complex, stable dram. I could happily sit here all night with this dram, and come back tomorrow to have some more. It’s a really excellent whisky, showing some real quality. I consider it excellent value for money from this entry level Glencadam. I’m looking forward to trying more on my whisky journey.

20131016-184625.jpg