Whisky Review – Aberlour 16 year old. Single cask TWE Exclusive. @whiskyexchange

Aberlour 16 year old. Single cask TWE Exclusive
53.5% ABV

Cask #4738

Non chill filtered

No added colouring

£99.95 from The Whisky Exchange





Nose. 

First sniff. Lots of rich orange oils, boiled oranges, big time sherry notes. Clove, Christmas cake. Each sniff gets bigger and bigger in aromas in a short period of time. Going to let it sit for a bit with a cover. Oooooo. 15 mins or so later. Massive sherry bombastic. Sweet and nutty. There’s almost an Armagnac feel to it. Lots of rich dark dried fruit. Sultanas. Raisins. Oranges, now with added peel. Lots of cake and Christmas spices. Almond rich marzipan. Thick honey. It’s heavenly. Where A’bunadh is In your face sherry massive, this dram is more mellowed, still huge, but calmer, deeper in its aroma.

Palate. 

Thick, sweet then bittersweet, then back to thick sweet! Loads of dark fruitcake inspired fruit, cinnamon, cloves, lots of chocolate and honeycomb, it goes on and on and on. Slightly mentholated, cough sweets, a touch of sweet liquorice. A small sip of this goes a very long way. The mouthfeel is oily, costing, very fulfilling. It’s bloody fantastic. I’m a big fan of A’bunadh, this is notched up greatly. Immensely approachable at cask strength, extremely intense, a smile generator of some magnificence. 

Finish. 

Long, lots of sherried fruitcake intensity, chocolate melted and mixed with honey and orange juice. Chest warming and with a high level feel good factor. 

Adding water. 

I don’t want to add too much as I’m loving this at cask strength. If anything the nose has an added intensity. More concentrated on the spices and an added nuttiness. There is also a little extra dusty warehouse about it. The palate continues to be a delicious event, slightly smoothed out with the minimal dilution. The finish is slightly drier, and I would probably prefer the undiluted finish and overall experience. It’s one to add only the very slightest of water if at all. 

Conclusion. 

Delicious. A’bunadh cranked up in quality by 100%. This dram has all the sherry monster intensity with added refinement that age has given it. Tremendous cask selection, absolutely no hint of any kind of sulphur. Just plain magnificent. Love it. Now, price wise there is a touch of a dilemma as you could have two bottles of A’bunadh for the price of one of these….My logic says A’bunadh, but the heart and soul, plus the sheer experience means this is quite a must. These single casks don’t come around very often.

Many thanks to Speciality Drinks for the review sample

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Whisky Review – anCnoc 12 year old. @ancnoc_whisky 

anCnoc 12 year old 

40% ABV

£30.86 from Master of Malt

Nose. 

Very very fruity. Lots of fresh apples, soft fruit intense, apricot, peach and honeydew melon. There are even some tropical fruits creeping in there. Bright summer honey, and yellow flowers! This reeks of late spring and early summer. Absolutely lovely. Exceedingly appealing and what I would define as a smell of happiness.  

Palate. 

The arrival is sweet, clean, fresh, loads of fruit again, apples, oranges, apricot, melon, it’s a big fruit basket of a palate. Some sweet, crystallised ginger and a pinch of white pepper. Sugar coated puff pastry, icing sugar, very sweet and moreish. If you have a sweet tooth this is a treat and a half. Extremely refreshing for a whisky. 

Finish. 

Light honey lingers for a long time, it’s almost mead like. Along with a touch of wood spice, sweet ginger and those sweet summer fruits. 

Adding water. 

Only a small drop added as already at 40%. The nose is slightly more herbal now, with touches of green grass and moss. Almost a level of earthy peatiness about it. Much more floral as well, with the heavy intense fruitiness quite diminished. The palate is still sweetly intense, it’s quite understated in its complexity, one minute I think this is quite a simple dram, and the next it’s really doing some odd and comes things on the palate. It’s more herbal now, sweet ginger still present, but also some aniseed. The finish is also carrying forward this light, sweet aniseed note. Lovely stuff…with or without water? Different experience either way so it’s worth an experiment to make your own mind up. 

Conclusion. 

A delicious breakfast or summer whisky. It’s light, but full of flavour, bags and bags of fruity sweetness. If you have a sweet tooth this is perfect for you. I will be reviewing a bunch of anCnoc whiskies over the coming weeks, look out for them. I had to start here though. 18 and 22 year old expressions coming soon!

From my own stash. 

Whisky Review – Ardbeg Dark Cove’s (Ardbeg Night release) @ardbeg_com

It’s that Islay festival time of the year again, and Ardbeg are scrapping Ardbeg Day!!!!! For Ardbeg Night is here, and to celebrate we have the release of Dark Cove. Ardbeg Night is on May 28th and many events are taking place around the globe. Of course all Ardbeg events lead to Islay and the main celebration will be at their distillery on that evening.

The festival bottling for this year is Dark Cove. Paying homage to the shadowy past of Ardbeg’s coastline, this expression is made up of whisky matured in sherry and ex-bourbon wood. Like last year 2 versions have been released. A 55% committee release which went on sale a few weeks back and promptly sold out online (probably some left at the distillery shop?). And a retail release coming out on the 28th of May which comes in a box (unlike the committee version) and bottled at 46.5%. It’s unclear if the committee version is cask strength (I’m assuming not), or if these are completely different vattings, I’m just going to taste, compare and contrast the pair of them as I’m fortunate enough to have got in on a bottle share of the committee bottling with some like minded friends.

Ardbeg Dark Cove (retail release)46.5% ABV

Non Chill Filtered

£94.99 – available from 28th May at selected retailers

Nose. 

First sniff and we have quite a sweet, grassy, sherry led nose. Dark fruits, some crumbs of fruitcake, orange peel and a pinch of clove and cinnamon. The smoke comes in subsequent sniffs, light, gentle whiffs of peak smoke, a medicinal smoke, some TCP, antiseptic, hospital bandages. Quite light and easy to get the nose right in the glass. There’s some ozone, salty sea air whiffs coming through with time, transporting me back to the pier at Ardbeg. 

Palate. 

A balance of sweet and sour in the arrival, sweet brown sugar, Creme brûlée crunchy coating and some tarty lemon juice. The development goes into rich chocolate, milky coffee, dark fruits, some berries, sweet ginger, pepper, light ashiness. The mouthfeel is nicely oily, and it’s immensely sippable, pleasurable to keep going back to. In fact, disturbingly so, I’ve had to stop myself so I can write something before it all disappears! Later in the development there is a lovely red berry jamminess that becomes apparent. It’s tasty stuff indeed. 

Finish. 

Medium to long length finish, ginger spice, light fruitcake, some honey and a wisp of smoke lingers back, with a treacle coating left inside the mouth. Very good. 

Adding water. 

Not adding too much. The nose is lighter now, a little more medicinal smokiness, not so much fruit and more herbal and floral in nature. There’s a subtle spiced ham meatiness. Some extra saltiness. The palate is surprisingly fruitier now, quite intense very tasty, sipability just increased! There is some added sweet liquorice herbal notes. The finish is very similar as undiluted, less of the treacle leftovers though. 


Ardbeg Dark Cove (Commitee release)

55% ABV

Non Chill Filtered

£84.99 – direct from Ardbeg (sold out online)

Nose. 

First sniff. Very reminiscent of the RR, more treacle and sweetness. Quite honey led, with chocolate and some honeycomb in addition to the spicy fruitcake. Sherried raisin, clove, cinnamon, a little more Danish pastry like. Fruitcake a plenty, orange juice and peel. Things take a little longer to open up, but then comes the smoke, subdued slightly, medicinal, herbaceous. Green with Moss and earthiness. It’s very gentle, like the retail release, but there is a little more depth to the sweetness, and a little more swimming in treacle toffee notes. Nice. 

Palate. 

Thick, sweet, intense treacle, honey, jammy dark fruits, chocolate, honeycomb, there’s a lot going on, very similar to the retail, but dialled up 3 notches in intensity and flavour. There’s a real MMMMMMMMmmmmmmmm factor, if you know what I mean! The coffee notes are stronger, darker. The jam notes are stickier, thicker. The spices are actually more complimentary, along for the ride, not as intense. There is some sticky tar, ashes and the lovely coastal sea air stuff, which again, is more supplementary, enhancing the intensity of the stickier flavours. The mouth feel is big, invasive and feels great. 

Finish. 

Medium to long length again, lots of sweet fruits and herbal smokiness hangs around, hot coal burps, in a very good way. Finalises quite dry, but with a dry treacle feeling stick to the inside of the mouth. 

Adding water. 

Not sure there is much point as I’m sure I’ll get the retail version, but will try. Actually another variation. The nose is more like the retail, but smokier, more medicinally phenolic. The palate less intense, definitely getting more of the sour notes from the undiluted retail version, the toffee is still quite heavy though and the fruits are going almost cherry juice like. Would this suggest they are different vattings, or are we just talking randomness of dilution (I’m not exactly being scientific about quantities of liquid etc). The finish is sweet herbal, a little smoke and a little treacle in the mouth. So diluted this does become very similar, but not quite to the retail version. Personally I prefer undiluted. 

Conclusion. 

Ok, so first off I prefer the committee release. Undiluted it has an extra intensity and delicious range of flavours and overall experience. If you can get it at its SRP of 84.99 then it’s well worth it. But good luck with that. I think the retail release is very nice as well, it’s a good solid tasty whisky. The only problem I have is price. When you can get the high strength Ardbeg Uigeadail for around £55, I find it very hard to justify the extra cost on the Dark Cove. Don’t get me wrong, it’s a different experience entirely, but that Uigeadail is awesome awesome awesome!!! 

The sad truth is a lot of the Ardbeg Festival release bottlings will be bought to stow away for trading and selling later on, as ‘fine’ as this is, whisky is meant for drinking. When you buy it. Pop the cork, drink the stuff. Please. 

Thanks to Ardbeg for providing the review sample of Dark Cove (46.5%).

Ardbeg Dark Cove Committee release (55%) from my own stash.  

Whisky Review – SMWS 127.44 Cantina Mexicana (Port Charlotte) @smwsuk @bruichladdich

SMWS 127.44 Cantina Mexicana (Port Charlotte) @smwsuk

Distillery – Port Charlotte (Bruichladdich)

Maturation – second fill ex-oloroso sherry butt

Age – 12 years old

65.9% ABV

Non Chill Filtered

No Added Colouring

£120 (for members) from SMWS’ Islay Festival Party

£240 (non-members – but why aren’t you a member anyway?! :))






Nose.

First pour and sniff, inviting fruit cocktail with a background air of bonfire smoke. Just a few sniffs and the bonfire is enraged and bellowing out its epic delightful fume. A little time and the smoke clears a little revealing a softer, creamier, buttery side. Touches of milk left in the sun and some fizzy refresher sweeties. A little more time and the nose continues to evolve, now quite vegetal in prominence, damp forest floors with lots of rotting foliage (in a good way). A little more time and we are back to a fruit basket, baked apples and forest berries stewing away in a pot. Suggestion of honey and thick toffee to come in time or with a bit of water added (we will see). It’s a lively and lovely Port Charlotte nose, very vibrant and representative. Lots going on and lots of fun to have with it without even sipping!

Palate.

Woh, it’s big, very complex. Arrival is tart, sour lemons, quite sharp indeed, thick bitter toffee, but then slowly a buttery softness comes through, lots of ashy soot, ashtray stuff, the toffee becomes creamy, fizzy fruit bonbons. The mouthfeel is huge and invasive. The development continues into the fields (literally) with some earthy green, damp moss and akin to chewing liquorice root. Some thick berry jamminess comes through late making this very chewy indeed. 

Finish.

An effervescent fruit toffee reduction lasts around for absolutely ages, with the smoke coming back with every slight exhale or burp, feels like I’ve been smoking again! A lactic milkiness also accompanies the smoky after event. It goes on and on and on, it’s a proper Duracell finish! 

Adding water.

A fair amount added and sat. The nose still retains a large amount of bonfire pyre smoke. The nasal experience is more concentrated around the herbal elements, burning heather, burnt liquorice root chewed heavily. A creamy porridge cereal note is prominent. The sweeter elements are more treacle on top of porridge with a few red berries surrounding it. The palate is much less sharp, arrival still has a bitter edge, but is quicker to become thick and sweet, with the toffee and fudgey caramel notes coming through. The finish returns to the familiar undiluted finish, smoky burps, less effervescent and slightly fruitier, very creamy and the cereals also stick around, still immensely long, I’m going to be tasting this in the morning. 

Conclusion. 

A great single cask Port Charlotte, very reminiscent of some of the Valinch releases I’ve had direct from the distillery. Immensely jealous of all those going to Feis Ile this coming week, but this has brought a little bit of the party to my lounge, so I’m very happy for that experience. The only slight quibble I have over this whisky is the price point. It is expensive. If you can afford it and like the sound of it though it is a great experience whisky. 

Thanks so much to SMWS for providing the review sample. 

Whisky Review – Laphroaig 10 year old Cask Strength Batch 007 @laphroaig

Laphroaig 10 year old Cask Strength Batch 007

56.3% ABV

Non Chill Filtered

£50.15 – You can buy batch 008 from Laphroaig directly on this link. 

Nose. 

Rich, earthy, smoky on the first sniff. Bonfire smoke, and loads of it. Medicinal TCP in the background. Tar. Sea air. Fishing villages. Shellfish. Scallops. Sandy shores. Sea salt encrusted rocks in the sun. Dried dark fruits. Sherried raisins. Cigarettes dipped in sherry. Citrus juices and lemon rind coming forward now. There is absolutely bucket loads going on in this glass. This is awesome. Special. Islay. Laphroaig. Time in the glass and more maritime notes, smoke is more peat like and smouldering. Monster. 

Palate. 

Monster. Sweet, maple syrup coated bacon arrival, big, thick, huge mouthfeel. Mmmmmm. Mmmmmmm mmmmmmm. Develops into more sweet, BBQ glory. Lots of dried fruits, raisin mainly, with some stewed Apple. There’s some liquorice and dark chocolate. Over stewed black tea. The sweetness is thick and treacle like, bittersweet, delicious. Extremely easy to sip at full strength.

Finish. 

Herbal cough sweets, iodine, treacle toffee, some tannins, a lot of flavour over a medium-long duration. Remaining sweet, syrupy and slightly herbal at the very end. Fantastic. 

Adding water. 

Adding a good slosh. The nose is a little less in smoky intensity but fresher now. More maritime, sea air intensive, a great sea breeze on a fresh day. The palate at the diluted strength and you have more access to the depth of sweetness, with the herbal elements more integrated alongside added fruit juiciness, it’s so flavourful it’s emotional. There is a rich treacle intensity going into the finish which is just long, full of smoke, herbal peat, earthiness, toffee and all round yumminess. It’s difficult to explain the balance and level of flavours. You’ll just have to trust me when I say this is frakking delicious. 

Conclusion. 

This is my favourite of the Laphroaig’s. The 10yo cask strength continues to be so flavoursome, massive, and an absolute joy to experience. I only wish there was more of it rather than the yearly release, but at least this way I get to try other things and not just stick with it year long. Love love love it. Want more more more. 

From my own stash. The last of my bottle. 

Whisky Review – Laphroaig Lore @laphroaig

Laphroaig Lore

48% ABV

Non Chill Filtered

£77.95 from Master of Malt

Here’s my little story of my experience of Laphroaig. A long time ago I was younger, and didn’t really appreciate whisky. When I was out with some work colleagues drinking beer quite heavily (as I would do in my twenties), I was presented with a glass of whisky. I sniffed it, it smelled disgusting, TCP, antiseptic, Jesus, WTF! It tasted odd. Very odd. And then I was sick as a dog. Fast forward someteen years and now I appreciate it, I like it, it’s not as TCP as even I’ve known it to be in the 5 or so years I’ve come to appreciate whisky, but it’s still a solid dram I would never turn my nose up at the 10 year old. The 10yo Cask Strength is just amazing, as is the 18. 

Now we have the latest expression. Lore. No age on it, but is said to contain some 21 year old stock (viva transparency!). I’ve read some mixed opinions and reviews and I’m writing this foreword without having opened the sample. I want to try this as opinion free as possible, but it’s a bit late for that. I will endeavour to unlearn what I have learned and just take this as blind as I can. Drink on. 

Nose. 

On first sniff from the pour it’s quite wine like. White dry wine (I’m no expert on wine types), within seconds some familiar TCP laden medicinal smokiness comes out of the glass. Some antiseptic ointment and memories of sticking plasters for scuffs and cat scratches! Fruit comes foreword next, with some crisp apple and white berries, grapes, ripe gooseberry amongst the smoke beginning to turn bonfire like. There’s a touch of floral heather, and a spot of honey. A little more time and the fruit is turning citrusy with waxy lemons. There’s a spot of pepper in the back of the throat with deep sniffs. A longer wait in the glass and we have a lot more fruit coming forward orchard berries, apples, pears, a harvest fruit basket, well integrated into the peat fire with some complementary floral heather. This is a nice balanced Islay nose. 

Palate. 

This is taking a while to deconstruct, it’s quite challenging and complex. The mouthfeel has some oiliness, but isn’t as overly coating as I would have expected. The arrival is sweet then immediate dry, spicy and herbal heavy. Liquorice root, straw (dried grass), dried dark fruits, dry ginger beer, or even Stone’s ginger wine. Smoke definitely, and something odd I can’t quite put my finger on, I think it’s the dry ginger throwing me. There’s quite a bit of oakiness to this one, old wood, some tar, black imp sweets, aniseed by the bucketload, even a touch of Parma violets in the background. This is one to sip over and over and play around with.

Finish. 

The odd dry ginger/herbal element progresses through a medium length finish. Which becomes quite dry, ginger heavy, some sawdust, very dry in fact, gum shrinking, but strangely compelling. The dryness sticks around forever!

Adding water. 

A splash added. The nose is smokier, more bonfire smoke with some BBQ mackerel and some sticky glazed port cutlets. There’s the slightest touch of rubber some charred fruit and tomato on the BBQ smoking away as well. Some freshly cut sods of earth. It’s really woken up with a drop of water. The palate has actually got thicker and fruitier, juicier. Even the mouthfeel seems oilier now. Fruits are more vibrant, younger and juicier, some sweet lemon and orange join the dark fruits from earlier. Liquorice is sweeter. The herbal notes are tonned down but still present, and the peat and earthy edges are more integrated. The dry ginger note has moved into the late development and more prominent at the start of the finish, which is slightly less dry and all together a lot tastier. This one works very well with some water added. 

Conclusion. 

It’s fascinating stuff. It’s not very Laphroaig like though! Which I can imagine dedicated Laphroaig-ers would find troublesome. It’s very definitely unique, tasty, oddly fascinating, very very dry and worth a try. With water it’s even better! Price wise, all I’ll say is it’s a shame it’s not cheaper (a statement I make very frequently nowadays). When you have awesome Laphroaig stable expressions like the 10 year old and quarter cask, it’s very difficult to impress. Especially when things get more expensive. 

Tomorrow I’m going to conclude the Laphroaig triple postings with my favourite of the Laphroaig family so far! 🙂

Many thanks to Laphroaig for the review sample

Whisky Review – Laphroaig Select 

Laphroaig Select

40% ABV

£34.00 from Master of Malt

Nose. 

On first pour we have a spot of confusion. I’m wondering if my sample has got ‘old’. It’s not very smoky. There’s a little smoke, but there’s a lot of fruit, mostly grape and some citrus, and some odd wood funkiness, a little cardboard. A little time and it reminds me more of the kiln at Laphroaig, some smokey creamy barley, some pepper, some berries, something still a little odd. Confused. Light. It feels like the whisky in my glass wants to be bigger, brasher, harder, but being held back by its own size. It’s easy enough to sniff, it’s almost mentholated as I seem to be able to breath easier. Not what I would have expected. 

Palate. 

Light, a touch watery on the mouthfeel. Arrival is dry, heated, some smoke, peat, then turns sweet, with some green mossy earth, a touch of dried fruits, apple crisps, a little dried lemon peel, that’s about it. 

Finish. 

Short. A little dry dirty peat smoke then just like Keyser Soze, poof, it’s gone. It actually leaves a little of the cardboard funkiness behind leading me to go to the water. 

Adding water. 

A small drop of water added, for fear of murdering what is there. The nose is weakened, it’s also a little less funky, just a mellow light smoke and a touch of fruit now. The palate is more watery, obviously, smoke, some added honey softness, still got an odd thing going on, damp cardboard, then nothing. Finish, shorter, more transparent. 

Conclusion. 

Laphroaig lite. Might be worth using as an introduction to someone who isn’t used to peaty whisky, but then again it’s not a good introduction, as even as a ‘lite’ variant I don’t find it anything reminiscent of the great things that Laphroaig can be. Sorry. If any fellow bloggers out there thinks my sample maybe borked please shout out. 

Many thanks to Laphroaig for the review sample. 

Whisky Review – Port Askaig 100° Proof. @whiskyexchange @portaskaigmalt

Port Askaig 100° Proof

57.1% ABV

Non chill filtered

No added colouring


£44.95 from The Whisky Exchange

Nose. 

On first sniff there is quite a pungent, smoke intense, spirit led fire in my nostrils! Pulling back a little and we have lots of floral, heather, herbal going on. Some green grass, green pine, very green basically, with a background of roaring peat fires and boggy moss pits. A little time and things get oilier, literally, machine oil, engine oil, a whiff if diesel. All dirty mechanical stuff. With a backing of some bramble berries. Lovely! A little more time and things get dirtier, earthier, this is Islay. 

Palate. 

Big flavours from the offset. Arrival is sweet, earthy, lots of peat, then a bite of alcohol hits and runs. The development has layers of fruit, bramble berry jams, cooking apple, some tart lemon. Then we get more sugar led sweetness, sugar mice, earthiness returns and some herbal liquorice root with it. Sweet pepper spices runs throughout. The mouthfeel is very oily and gets everywhere nicely. Lovely thick spirit, lots and lots of smoke of course all the time, a roaring smokey, green stuff fed (fresh cut fern tree burning) flames. An immense experience, lots of complexity and more reasons to go back than the liquid in the glass allows! More liquid needed! 

Finish. 

Lots of smoke remains for a long finish. Cigar smoke, bonfire smoke all right in the back of the throat and coming out of the nose, extreme stuff. The greener flavours come back at the end, a touch of drying pine and green leaves, heather. 

Adding water. 

A few drops added, though this is awesome undiluted. The nose now has a serious bonfire going on, breathtaking, it’s all about the smoke, with the fruit and herbal notes going to the back. The palate has added creaminess, and actually feels oilier on the tongue. It’s still immensely dirty, oily (rag) stuff, a touch more liquorice, less root and more of the sweetie variety. The finish is long, sweeter, with a touch of cough candy sweets, lots of liquorice and lush. Water does do this dram good. 

Conclusion. 

The whole experience of this whisky is quite remarkable, it’s like travelling from one side of a country lush field to the other with a massive roaring inferno right in the center. A great journey to take, from sniff, sip and extinguish. This is Islay. It’s brilliant! If you like your smokey whisky young, vibrant and full of that smokey goodness, this is one for you! 

Many thanks to Speciality Drinks for the review sample

Whisky Review – Ardmore Triple Wood @focuspr

Ardmore Triple Wood

46% ABV

Non chill filtered


~£40 from Travel Retail 





Nose. 

On first sniff we have a very sugar sweet honey field of heather (intentional way around!). Mossy damp earth, and a touch of peat smouldering in the background. There are some fruitier elements coming forward in time. Crisp apple, grape juice, red current and blackberries. All freshly picked. Vibrant and reminiscent if a summer fruit basket. 

Palate. 

Beautifully sweet and fruity arrival, lots of fresh fruit as per the nose, berry rich, fresh fruit salad intensity. Apples, blackberries, rhubarb, red berries. Really juicy and lovely tasting making this exceptionally moreish. Some light pepper, and sweet cinnamon. Lots of honey run hand in hand with the fruit, but compliments rather than battles it. The smoke isn’t so evident on the palate, but there is a touch of dirty earth notes floating around in the development. The fruit is dominant throughout the experience though. 

Finish. 

Fresh fruit and honey fades, and some of the earthy moss returns during the medium-long length finish. 

Adding water. 

A few drops and a little time. The nose is sweeter, more powdered sugar and floral notes are evident and forefront. The palate has more confectionary sweetness, still fruitier, but everything is coated in sugar rather than complimented with honey syrup, the smoke is still about, and a little more smokey, less earthy. The finish is more about the peat now, quite dirty. It’s a swings and roundabouts as to if you would like water more with this or not, I personally prefer the fruity bursts, so I wouldn’t water this one myself. 

Conclusion. 

This is an absolute fruit monster of a dram. Very summery, very delicious. I’m surprised! It tastes beyond its age (assuming it’s young due to NAS nature). So much fruit, fresh and active and very delicious. I will be searching this out on my next travels. 

Many thanks to Ardmore for the review sample

Whisky Review – Longmorn 1990 24 year old Single Malts of Scotland. @whiskyexchange

Longmorn 1990 24 year old Single Malts of Scotland

53.7% ABV

Cask #191954

Non chill filtered

No added colouring
£94.95 from The Whisky Exchange

Nose. 

First breath and we have some toffee covered in dusting chocolate. Quite a backing of thick fruit jams. Berry laden and rich. Vanilla frosting. Immediately approachable and hunger inducing. Something slightly menthol in the very distance, possibly even spearmint. A little time in the glass and there is more honey and a touch of oak. This is a very understated and relaxing nose, which you can spend a long time teasing out the complexities. Just pulling away and coming back and there is more overripe fruit now, bananas, mushed up, with a touch of melon and peach. 

Palate. 

 A gentle and sweet, fruit filled arrival, peach, orange, melon, touch of pineapple, all very juicy and fresh. Honey follows, some chocolate and a touch of salted caramel. The mouthfeel is nicely coating and gives a great warmth across the palate. The strength is surprisingly drinkable before water is added. The development continues sweet and honey rich, with a touch of bitter orange peel/pith. 

Finish. 

Honey rich, slightly bitter orange and vanilla fade out during this long finish, with a touch of dryness at the end. Remnants of a dark chocolate can be sensed on the palate a long time after the whisky has faded. 

Adding water. 

A few drops added and several minutes to sit. The nose has a touch more floral, still sweet with sticky sugary delights. The palate is richer and has a greater range to the flavours, much of the same as the undiluted, but levelled up. The finish is richer with honey and the bitter notes now gone, it’s very beautiful, delicious and gentile all the way through.  

Conclusion. 

This is a delightful, flavourful, understated, relaxed whisky. I’m thoroughly enjoying it. It’s very much a chill out dram, suitable for anytime in the year and every time you need to just chill the hell out with a sweet fruity gentle, caring dram. 

Many thanks to Speciality Drinks for the review sample