Whisky Review – Glenglassaugh Octaves Peated. @glenglassaugh

Glenglassaugh Octaves Peated

44% ABV

Non chill filtered

No added colouring

£55.84 from Master of Malt 

It’s getting colder evenings now, so worthy of a wee peaty dram, let’s try this relatively new one from Glenglassaugh. Matured in Octaves (small casks 1/8th the size of a Sherry butt) from a peated spirit, this will be interesting. 

Nose. 

A smokey floral note is immediate on first pour, followed quickly by a light fresh cream dairy amongst the burning heather. Those elements merge in time and the cream becomes more buttery. Soft ginger and cracked black pepper backs things up. The smoke remains dominant, not overpowering or a peat bomb, just a gentle smouldering dram. 

Palate. 

More of a peat bomb on the palate, with smoke transpires to warm coals and ash. Sweetness comes through in the late arrival with a fruity citrus burst of lemon and orange, in time the fruity elements introduce something peachy into the mix. The dirty smoke moves aside and a creamier, meatier edge comes through, I don’t know why, but butter chicken comes to mind! Maybe with a dash of chopped burnt bacon on top! With that brings a slight salty edge to the smoke, with a touch of rose petal (light Turkish delight) thrown in for good measure. 

Finish. 

Smoke fades out during the medium length finish, with fruit retaining some ground and giving a nice juicy peach/orange effect, warming to the core. Nice, revitalising stuff. 

Adding water. 

A touch of water extinguishes the smoke quite significantly, with the floral notes now being the outgoing aroma. There is a little added orange juiciness on the nose now, but the spice is also toned back significantly. The palate has lost some of its bite, but the smoke comes in later in the development, there is more fruit now, softer fruits, almost melon like, with the meatiness quietened and the profile changed a lot. The finish is weaker, a little earthier and far more floral. I prefer this dram without water, but I may have put too much in. Worth further experimentation. 

Conclusion. 

It’s young, and has he peaty backbone for it, which is a good thing. A medium level peat beast worthy of someone who has taken a light step into the peated whisky world and want to try something a little more levelled up. It’s starting to get colder in the evenings and this dram would match it perfectly. 

Many thanks to Glenglassaugh for the review sample

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Whisky Review – Timorous Beastie 40 year old @DLaingWhisky @remarkablemalts #TimorousBeastie40

Timorous Beastie 40 year old

54.7% ABV

Non chill filtered

No added colouring


£199.95 from Master of Malt

A 40 year old whisky for £199.95 retail is an exceptionally rare thing nowadays. Timorous beastie is a highland blended malt, normally without age statement it is a nice tasty, easy going dram. This limited (to 1,080 bottles) release presented at cask strength is promising to be something of a special experience. Let’s sip and find out. 

Colour. 

A natural tree sap amber syrupy hue, as if nectar running directly from the oak itself. Glass coating and hanging on for dear life. This is already looking to be an oily and exquisite sip. 

Nose. 

On first pour we have an obvious rich aged oak, with tropical fruit jam intensity. Pineapple, grilled and crushed. Overripe banana. Juicy stewed cooking apples. After a little time the oak sits gently in the background. Freshly varnished. The fruit jam becomes more intense and pronounced. There is a little cinnamon dusting, sweet pepper and a hint of spearmint. This still has a good punch and freshness on the nose despite its long life, which is a great thing. After a little more time the aroma becomes sweeter, like a pour of runny honey over the exotic fruit salad, and a touch of heat added to caramelise the dish. More time only gives this dram added depths. There’s a well refined waxiness to the fruit, and a perfect aromatic balance between oak and juice. Well deserved of it’s own fragrance. L’odeur du Beastie. 

Palate. 

Takes your mind away, a little too far. Difficult to write. Sweet and sour arrival. Lots of oak and tarty citrus. A gentle slap of tasty oak embers. Things evolve quickly and we get lots of tropical fruit punch, fruit salad chewy sweets, the chewiness runs through into the mouthfeel which is coating and viscous. The oiliness brings a sweet cinnamon frosted bun and added tinned pineapple and mandarin juices to the experience. Lots of honey and toasted sugar continue through the development. The flavours change, the order slightly different, the richness of the fruit varying, it’s an amazing dram, that gives each new sip new rewards. 

Finish. 

Long, gentle, sweet and spicy Cinnabon continues alongside some creamy vanilla custard, pineapple and mandarin flesh still cling fresh for a good while. The gentle chest hugging warmth remains true and feels so good. 

A feisty and voluptuous dram, enrobed with matured decadence and thoroughly delicious. Need more. 

Adding water. 

I’m not. I’m enjoying it too much. Sorry. (Plus – I ran out!) 

Conclusion. 

Nectar of the Gods. This dram is swishable and chewable around the mouthparts, the flavours transporting you to the lush highlands filling your being with relaxation and joy. It’s truly gorgeous. Perfect for ending a hard day with. There aren’t going to be many 40 year old whiskies available at such an affordable price. 

Many thanks to Douglas Laing for the competition win review sample

Whisky Review – Loch Lomond Single Grain @LochLomond3 @TheWhiskyWire #WhiskyFlashBlog #LochLomond

Loch Lomond Single Grain

46% ABV

Non chill filtered (confirmed by Master Blender)
£31.32 From Master of Malt (Old design)

#whiskyflashblog. Many online whisky commentators will be posting reviews of this particular whisky today. Follow the action and contrast the reviews by searching for #whiskyflashblog and #LochLomond on Twitter. 

The Loch Lomond Single Grain, is Loch Lomond distillery’s latest re-release (same liquid as previous release but with rather fetching new bottle/tube) after the relaunch of the Inchmurrin range last year. This single grain is made from a malted barley mash, so why isn’t it single malt? Well, it’s distilled through a continuous Coffey still, as it’s not in a pot still it cannot be labelled as a single malt as far as Scotch Whisky Association regulations are concerned.  

I got to try this whisky at Dramboree this year when we had a rather stunning tour/day of activities at the distillery. I thoroughly enjoyed it then. Let’s taste and find out if my memory serves true. 

Nose. 

First sniff from the pour has a fresh pineapple juice intensity. Vanilla ice cream, some pepper & Ginger develop in time, but the fresh juicy tropical fruit is foremost. Some underripe banana, crisp green apple, sugar syrup follow in time. The ginger notes become more ginger snap confectionary like. Some remembrance of tutti fruity chewing gum is now present. A custard rich vanilla is present, but more in the background. This isn’t a single grain the likes of which I have had before. Tasted blind this would be very difficult to identify as grain. The nose is reminding me of some Irish single malts I have had in the past. An additional waxy lemon note comes forward given more time. 

Palate. 

There is an immediately thick, velvety mouthfeel to the first sip which leads me to believe this is non chill filtered though this is not mentioned anywhere as of yet. The oiliness really makes this a pleasure to sip, I’ve had a few and haven’t even started deconstructing yet! Ok, creamy, fresh vanilla up front, custard viscosity. Citrus juices with a waxy mouth coating. Lemons, limes, a touch of orange and pineapple. It’s a beautiful fruit salad all throughout the development. There’s a hint of ginger, some cardamom, vanilla pod & creamy Devon custard. Delicious. Immensely sippable. 

Finish. 

Custard rich with some of the fruit juices floating their way through a medium length sweet finish, with a touch of waxy dryness at the very end. 

Adding water. 

Some drops added to half a dram (although it is easy to drink without dilution). The fruitiness has become drier on the nose, more waxy, a little less juicy, with some added confectionary dusting sugar. Pineapple cubes are the best way to describe the nose now, with some waxy lemon pith! The palate diluted has a slightly lessened texture, but is still quite oily. The fruits are amplified quite significantly, very juicy tarty lemons, sweetened, almost sherbert lemons with a creamier filling that sour sherbert. Custard lemons?! Lemon curd even! It’s beautiful anyway! The finish retains this custard lemon feel, slowly fading, creamy, waxy delightful texture. Lovely stuff. I’m surprised, but a few drops of water enlightens this dram. 

Conclusion. 

This is a superb session whisky. Easy drinking deliciousness. I think it would be very difficult to identify as a single grain in any blind taste test. Complex without overdoing it, the experience is well balanced, very tasty & moreish. The palate has a lovely quality oiliness to it which enhances the great flavours. I would very happily sit and drink this all night long. Purchase is essential for me!

Many thanks to Loch Lomond for the review sample