Whisky Review – Kiln Embers (Wemyss)

Kiln Embers (Wemyss)

46% ABV

Non chill filtered

£39.50 from Master of Malt
  

Kiln Embers is the latest blended malt release from Wemyss, it’s a limited edition (12,000 bottles) release in the same vein as last year’s exceptionally popular (and bloody tasty) Velvet Fig. This year it’s more towards the peated blend that Wemyss has chosen, perfect for the Autumn chill that’s starting to make itself known. Let’s taste, savour and warm ourselves up a bit. 

Nose. 

On first pour there are wafts of medicinal peat smoke, along with some twiggy bonfire ash. With a short time more heather floral notes and some rich honey make themselves known. Soft apples and a touch of sweetened lemons join in for a fruity edge. There is a lovely barley rich smoky softness throughout, reminding me of distillery maltings. Kiln embers is very apt. 

Palate. 

Sweet, grassy, organic arrival, quickly turning deliciously malty and long in the development with creamy malt, the reminiscence of standing in a foot deep of drying malt with the fans on. The mouthfeel is medium viscous and very velvety. The barley cream, slightly vanilla is the star of the palate. So sippable. There is a light custard drenched apple pie filling note during the later development. Smoke is transcending through the palate and nose throughout the taste which can be held on the tongue for a very long period. Little to no alcohol burn. 

Finish. 

Medium to long in length, creamy vanilla, sweet peat, dying embers, drying malted barley smoke. 

Adding water. 

Adding a little water to experiment, but is perfect without it. The nose has got a little drier now, with added floral and a touch of herbal throat sweets, some aniseed, cough candy twist, this is at the expense of the fruit which has died down, but smoke is still very present and prominent. The palate, while having lost a little viscosity in the mouthfeel is still exceptionally creamy and malty, with the accompanying smoke very enjoyable and slightly exaggerated now. The finish is all about that lovely, luscious, creamy malted barley richness. Water helps this dram more than it hinders it. This is fine whisky. 

Conclusion. 

A tremendous drop of nostalgia. Loads of peat, but gentle and, as the name suggests, it transports you to a working kiln. I know, I’ve been in one, and this has just taken me on a journey there and back again. Fantastic. 


Much thanks to Wemyss for the review sample

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